Our Services

Garfield Park Behavioral Hospital proudly serves children and teens, ages 3-17, with behavioral health needs, offering both acute inpatient and partial hospitalization.

Garfield Park Behavioral Hospital’s state-of-the-art facility is designed to be the safest place for your child to receive quality clinical evaluations, psychiatric services and short term stabilization. Our clinical team is comprised of psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, therapists and mental health specialists who actively engage each patient and family in treatment.

Patient Bill of Rights

  • As a patient as Garfield Park Behavioral Hospital, you are entitled to the rights outlined in the Mental Health Code and Developmental Disabilities Confidentiality Act and Chapter 2 of the Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities Code. We believe that, if you understand these rights, you can help us provide effective treatment and higher quality of care. These rights include, but are not limited to the following:
    • As a general rule, you lose none of your rights, benefits, or privileges simply because you are a recipient of mental health or developmental disabilities services. For example, you do not lose your right to vote or to attend religious services. However, you should know that persons admitted to mental health facilities will be disqualified from receiving firearm owner’s identification cards, and will lose such cards possessed prior to admission.
    • You have the right to treatment and nondiscrimination with regard to race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or disability. Referrals will be made if Garfield Park Behavioral Hospital does not offer appropriate treatment for you situation.
    • You have the right to be informed of your rights as a patient and of all rules and regulations governing your conduct as a patient in this facility.
    • You have the right to receive proper care and attention from service providers in the least restrictive environment appropriate to your needs.
    • You have the right to be treated with dignity and respect in the provision of all care and treatment. You have the right to privacy in your care and treatment and in the fulfillment of your personal needs.
    • You have the right to be informed of your clinical condition, unless your physician, for appropriate reasons, chooses not to inform you, and so indicates in your medical record. You have the right to actively participate in the development of your treatment plan, which will be implemented by the clinical staff and reviewed periodically.
    • You have the right to receive information necessary to give informed consent prior to the start of any procedure and/or treatment.
    • You (or your guardian on your behalf) have the right to refuse treatment and/or medication to the extent permitted by law and to be informed of the consequences of refusal of treatment. In an emergency, your refusal of treatment may be contradicted for your safety or the safety of others.
    • You have the right to be informed of all services available to you at the facility and of charges for these services. You have the right to a reasonable request for these services and/or a consultant.
    • You have the right to be informed by the prescribing physician of the benefits and/or risks and side effects of the drug(s) being prescribed in terms you are able to understand. In the event that you are unable to understand, your family or guardian shall be so informed.
    • You have the right to receive information necessary to give informed consent prior to being involved in activities that include the use of tape records, one-way observation mirrors, photography or any other special audio-visual techniques.
    • You have the right to review your treatment record, upon request, (with the assistance of a clinical staff member or your physician).
    • You have the right to confidential treatment of your personal and medical records. Information from these sources will not be released without your prior consent, unless required by law.
    • You have the right to maintain any social, religious, and community relationships: you are entitled to participate in, or to refrain from such activities unless the treatment team considers these activities are harmful to you.
    • You have the right to communicate with other people in private, without obstruction or censorship by the staff at the facility. The right includes mail, telephone calls and visits. Any limitations to these rights are outlined in our medical record and/or explained in patient handbooks.
    • You have the right to be informed in advance of any visitors to the facility. You have the right to see visitors, in privacy if desired, unless visitors are considered harmful to your welfare. You also have the right to refuse to see visitors there are limits upon this right. Communication by these means may be reasonably restricted, but only to protect you or others from harm, harassment, or intimidation. Visitation rights include the right to receive the visitors designated by the patient, including but not limited to another family member/support person/friend. Phone time is the right to make and receive phone calls to those family members/friends as designated by the patient. A “Support Person(s)” may be a family member, friend, or other individual who supports the patient during their hospital stay. A “Family member” means any person(s) who plays a significant role in an individual’s life. This may include a person(s) not legally related to the individual. Members of “family” include spouses, domestic partners, and both different-sex and same-sex significant others. “Family” includes a minor patient’s parents, regardless of the gender of either parent. Solely for purposes of visitation policy, the concept of parenthood is to be liberally construed without limitation as encompassing legal parents, foster parents, same-sex parent, step-parents, those serving in loco parentis, and other persons operating in caretaker roles
    • You are entitled to receive, possess, and use personal property unless it is determined that certain items are harmful to you or others. When you are discharged, all lawful property must be returned to you.
    • Restraints may be used only to protect you from physically harming yourself or others, or as a part of a medical or surgical procedure. Such restraints, if used, are to be in compliance with Garfield Park Behavioral Hospital policy regarding their use.
    • You have the right not to be mentally or physically abused or neglected.
    • If your rights are restricted, the facility must notify:
      • Your parents or guardian
      • You and person of your choice
      • At your request, the following agencies can be informed:
        • Garfield Park Behavioral Hospital Patient Advocate 773.265.4357
        • Corporate Compliance Hotline 800.852.3449

Non-discrimination policy

  • It is the policy of Garfield Park Behavioral Hospital to treat all patients and not discriminate with regard to race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or disability.

Equal Visitation

  • Visiting and Phone time is the right of every patient and it is an important part of patient treatment as well as transition back into the home and next level of care.
    • Visiting times are posted on the unit schedule and are listed in the Patient Handbook. Visiting and phone times and days are scheduled and structured in such a way as to promote a safe and supportive environment for patients and families/friends to visit.
  • Patients may receive visitors per their approved visitor list and according to the unit schedule
    • Patients may have no more than two visitors at a time and all visitors must be 18 years of age or older with proof of age required (photo ID)
  • Disruptive or abusive visitor language or behavior is not tolerated and the offensive visitor(s) will be addresses, and if required, removed from the premises.
  • Visitation rights include the right to receive the visitors designated by the patient, including but not limited to another family member/support person/friend. Phone time is the right to make and receive phone calls to those family members/friends as designated by the patient.
    • Support Person(s): May be a family member, friend, or other individual who supports the patient during their hospital stay
    • Family member: “Family member” means any person(s) who plays a significant role in an individual’s life. This may include a person(s) not legally related to the individual. Members of “family” include spouses, domestic partners, and both different-sex and same-sex significant others. “Family” includes a minor patient’s parents, regardless of the gender of either parent. Solely for purposes of visitation policy, the concept of parenthood is to be liberally construed without limitation as encompassing legal parents, foster parents, same-sex parent, step-parents, those serving in loco parentis, and other persons operating in caretaker roles.